Resourcing: An Important Framework for Strategy Implementation

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The most vital resources needed for the implementation of strategic objectives are the human resources.  When planning, it is expedient to plan with people in mind, for a hope of implementation of the strategic objectives. In other words, every member of an organization should have a business value, from the janitor to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Therefore, there is a need to analyze staff strength and their contributions. Is the output of each employee as an individual and as a member of a team worth the company’s expenses on him or her? It is also important to do a forecast of the demand and supply of resources at regular intervals. In fact, as strategy is monitored and redirected for relevance per time, resource analyses and forecast should also be carried out. This is the role of a recruitment/resourcing professional in the Human Resources Management (HRM) department and the respective line managers..

Every organization has a head count. Head count is the total number of current employees in an organisation. On the company-wide organogram, the headcount will be easily known. Recruitment can therefore be a replacement of staff on an existing role or an addition to the headcount, which could be as a result of creating a new role to ensure a successful implementation of strategy. It is important to note that the line managers are the respective job owners. Recruitment most times is initiated by the line manager. The line manager then works with HRM to get the necessary approvals before starting the recruitment process.

It is important for the HRM to work closely with the line managers to ensure that every role has a Job Description, Job Specifications, Goals (reviewed at every appraisal cycle), Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and recruitment turn-around-time. If the aforementioned are dutifully done with the necessary approvals to make it an official document, the recruitment process will be seamless. For every time there is a need for recruitment, that is not initiated by the line manager, the recruitment professional should ensure that the line manager is carried along.

How to source for candidates:

There are different approaches. Candidates can be garnered internally or externally. Internal candidates are from existing staff members, while external candidates are from the general public. Some HRM offices keep a pool of candidates in their Curriculum Vitae (CV) bank;  so, HR can seek to invite the ones that meet the criteria per time. Job adverts can be placed on job boards to seek from a wider pool of audience. Adverts can also be placed on the company’s social media accounts, e.g. LinkedIn, to get the information reach far and wide. In some cases, headhunting services might be required, especially for executive roles and very specialist/unique roles, where talents supply is low. Resourcing can also be outsourced to companies that specialize in people sourcing and recommendations.

Employment Tests:

There are different approaches to employment tests. It could be computer based, paper based test or hands on test. It could even be a game or etiquette test. Whichever test type must be appropriate for the role.  The General Mental Aptitude test (GMA) may be suitable for fresh graduates, but not for an experienced hire. Test for an experienced hire should be competency based, and tailored to each vacant role.

Interview:

Interviews could be face to face or technology aided. Face to face interview could be one on one or a panel interview. HRM should use the type of face to face that is most suitable. Technology supported interviews allow interviewing via skype, whatsapp, etc. Interview place could be anywhere, from traditional office setting to a restaurant or a game centre. The approach depends on what the recruiter is looking out for (etiquette, team spirit, coordination, handwriting, etc).

Multiple approaches can be used during interviews for a specific role. This way, interviews might be in stages. Sometimes, the reason behind interviewing in stages is for the candidates to see employment decision makers at different levels (of authority). It is important that the job owner fully participate in this process.

Based on collation of interview feedbacks, recruitment officer ranks the candidates, and together with the job owner, a final pick is made, subject to the necessary approvals in the organization.

The recruitment process is not concluded, until the new recruit starts work. Recruitment can only be tagged successful, if the new hire resumes, and stays in the organisation for a minimum of six months.

Gbemi Ibrahim

Gbemi Ibrahim

Gbemi has worked as a ghostwriter for well over ten years and counting. She is a pro in business and executive communication. More so, she has a mastery of creative writing and making a polished document out of disorganized thoughts and ideas.

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Gbemi Ibrahim

Gbemi Ibrahim

Gbemi has worked as a ghostwriter for well over ten years and counting. She is a pro in business and executive communication. More so, she has a mastery of creative writing and making a polished document out of disorganized thoughts and ideas.

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